The Double Prep - Application & Avoidance

In this lecture you'll learn:

  • What a double prep is
  • The select few situations in which to apply a double prep
  • The many situations where a double prep causes ensemble problems

Why You Need To Learn It

  • So you can be clear in where sound starts
  • Ensemble will breathe and play together

What Will Happen If You Don't

  • The ensemble will not watch you
  • The ensemble may come in early
  • The ensemble may come in late
  • The ensemble get nervous anticipating the beginning of a piece or section
  • You create an unclear gesture


General Principles

  • The more gestures we give before the beat the more likely someone will come in early
  • The longer the prep (more beats) the more nervousness it creates
  • When we count in verbally we train the ensemble NOT to watch
  • When we give multiple preps we are showing the ensemble we don't trust them to come in with a single upbeat


How to Train the Ensemble to Come In

  1. Get the ensemble to breathe together with you (no arms) and play a note
  2. Get the ensemble to breathe with you (with arms) and play a note
  3. This can be taught from lesson/rehearsal number one for beginners


Situations to Use A Double Prep

  • The tempo is fast (usually above 132) - ensemble needs more time to read the tempo and respond
  • Compound meter (eg. 3/4 in 1) - you may give more than one beat so they have time to read the tempo (and set their subdivision)


How to Give A Double Prep

  1. The additional prep beat/s have no preparation and no rebound
  2. Gestures are very small and passive (dead beats)
  3. There is no breath with the first gesture of the two preps (eg. beat 3 in 4/4 when the music starts on 1)
  4. Breathe on the final prep (eg. beat 4 in 4/4 when the music starts on 1)

Discussion

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